Wholesale Tamara Baskin

Sky Tallit Mezuzah

A supremely beautiful mezuzah from the heart and mind of designer Tamara Baskin. The deep, rich colors caught within the fused glass will shimmer with blessings over your doorstep for generations to come. You have never seen a mezuzah quite like this! A dazzling gift that is sure to be cherished.

As Each Piece Is Hand Made And Unique, No Two Will Be Exactly Alike.


If Not In Stock, This Item May Take Up To 3 Weeks To Ship.
Please Let Us Know If It Is Needed For a Specific Date.

$44.00

Description

Details

The technique of fusing glass goes back to biblical times. Layers of glass are cut and then arranged in a kiln to be fired to a temperature of 1550 degrees when it becomes one piece of glass. A second firing is required to form the piece into a bowl or platter. Slumping into a mold may create variations of crackling in the precious metal letters.

Additional Info

Additional Info

SKU ab
Size 3.75 inches
Learning A mezuzah is a small, sacred parchment contained within a decorative case that is affixed to the doorways of Jewish homes. The parchment contains passages from the Torah that include the verse, "And you shall inscribe these words upon the doorposts of your house and upon your gates." Hanging a mezuzah fulfills this mitzvah (commandment) of the Torah. Jewish law requires a mezuzah on every doorway in the home apart from bathrooms, and closets too small to qualify as rooms; but many families only place one in the front doorway. The parchment is prepared by a qualified scribe who has undergone many years of meticulous training, and the verses are written in black indelible ink with a special quill pen. The parchment is then rolled up and placed inside the case. It is customary to inscribe Shaddai, one of the biblical names of G-d, on the mezuzah; which also serves here as an acronym for Shomer Daltot Yisrael, "Guardian of Israel's doors". Many mezuzah cases are also marked with the Hebrew letter Shin, for Shaddai. According to halakha, the mezuzah should be placed on the right side of the door, in the upper third of the doorpost (i.e., approximately shoulder height), within approximately 3 inches (8 cm) of the doorway opening. Generally, halakha requires that mezuzot be affixed within 30 days of moving into a rented house or apartment. This applies to Jews living in the Diaspora. For a purchased home or apartment in the Diaspora, or a residence in Israel (owned or rented), the mezuzah is affixed immediately upon moving in. The reason for this difference is that there is an assumption that when a Jew lives in Israel, Israel shall remain his/her permanent residence, whereas a home in the Diaspora is temporary. The case can be affixed to the doorpost with nails, screws, glue, or double-sided tape. Wrapping the scroll in plastic wrap before placing it in the case will protect it from the elements. Care should be taken to not tear or damage the parchment or the wording on it, as this will invalidate the mezuzah, which is considered Torah. Where the doorway is wide enough, the mezuzah is tilted so that the top slants toward the room into which the door opens. This is done to accommodate the variant opinions of the medieval Rabbis Rashi and Rabbeinu Tam as to whether it should be placed horizontally or vertically, and also to imply that G-d and the Torah (which the mezuzah symbolizes) are entering the room. The procedure is to hold the mezuzah against the spot upon which it will be affixed, then recite a blessing: Baruch atta Adonai Eloheinu melech ha'olam, asher kideshanu bemitzvotav vetzivanu likboa' mezuza. Blessed are You, Lord our G-d, King of the Universe, Who sanctified us with His mitzvot, and commanded us to affix a mezuzah. Any Jew can recite the blessing provided he or she is old enough to understand the significance of the mitzvah. After the blessing, the mezuzah is attached. When affixing several mezuzot, it is sufficient to recite the blessing once, before affixing the first one. The commandment to affix a mezuzah is widely followed in the Jewish world, even by Jews who are not religiously observant. While the important part of the mezuzah is the "Klaff", or parchment, and not the case itself, designing and producing mezuzah cases has been elevated to an art form over the ages. Mezuzot are produced from an endless variety of materials, from silver and precious metals, to wood, stone, ceramics, and pewter.
Artist Bio Born and raised in Israel, Tamara Baskin moved to the United States where she began her career in art. A self taught artist with some twenty years experience working in several mediums, Tamara's Judaica works are fused glass, with an emphasis on creating elegant yet functional designs to celebrate Jewish life. Each piece is signed and dated.

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